One-Page Comic Contest: Prepping for a Visit with Lincoln Peirce

We are still in shock that next week we will be visited by Lincoln Peirce, the author of the bestselling Big Nate series. Lincoln is touring the country to promote his newest illustrated novel, Max and the Midknights. I can’t wait for students to be introduced to this new book. It has a little bit of everything: surprises, humor, medieval fights, mystery, magic, zombies, and more.

When an author/illustrator visits, I love to fill our windows and/or hallways with student work inspired by the author/illustrator. Sometimes there’s just not enough prep time, but luckily for Lincoln we knew a couple of months in advance.

When I read the Advance Reading Copy of Max and the Midknights, I saw that it opens with a one-page comic to setup the story. I thought this would be a great concept to invite students to try out. Instead of hosting class after class in the library, I made this a choice contest. In the contest, I invited students in any grade level to create a one-page comic on any topic. That’s pretty much the rules. They could create the comic on their own paper or use a pre-printed page of comic boxes that I provided in the library.

I introduced the contest on our morning broadcast and also made a video that teachers could share.

Students had a little less than 2 weeks to enter the contest and it didn’t take long to see that this was a high-interest topic. By the deadline date, we had over 100 entries in our contest from almost every grade level. It was impossible to pick winners by myself, so I had the help of Allie Melancon, SST, and my high school intern, Andrea Aramburo. I also had a few students, teachers, and my wife read a some comics too.

In the end, we picked 12 students to receive an autographed copy of Max and the Midknights. Thanks to a local organization called Books for Keeps, I had some other items I could hand out as prizes for about 50 honorable mention students.

These students received their choice of several doodling books, coloring books, magnetic storytelling kits, and comics.

Every student who entered a comic also has his/her work displayed on the windows of the library. As soon as the display went up, students, teachers, and families were stopping in the hall to read comics. We can’t wait for Lincoln Peirce to see them next week too.

I loved having this choice contest. It’s something I would like to try again with other author visits. It gives students one more way to interact with their library, one more way to make their voice heard, and one more way to be creative regardless of grade level, language, or background. I met some students in a new way through their art or writing. I saw some hidden talents that I didn’t realize were there.

We never know what opportunity is going to be the spark that students need in order to connect.

Presenting Graphic Novels

Way back in September, a group of 2nd grade students began exploring graphic novels in their spectrum class.  Their journey started in the media center with an overview of the elements of a graphic novel and how to read a graphic novel.  The students then spent several weeks reading graphic novels and writing reviews.  During this time, students also heard from cartoon experts such as Chuck Cunningham.

Next, students typed their graphic novel reviews, recorded them in audacity, uploaded them to our online catalog, and posted their reviews as blogs on our student book blog.

Simultaneously, these students worked with their spectrum teachers to write and create their own graphic novels.  They used rubrics and checklists to ensure that their graphic novels contained the elements of published graphic novels.

Today, students held a showcase in our media center to share their graphic novels with teachers and classes of students.  As visitors sat down at tables, the students read their graphic novels and talked about the process that they’ve gone through over the past few months.  The media center was buzzing with noise.  What a joy to hear the noise of student work being validated and showcased in such a public space!  Bravo to these students for their hard work.

View a video of the event here.

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